Is variability in software development good?

I myself wrote an article not too long ago on the subject of variability in process. Under some circumstances I think variability might be desirable, although I wasn’t particularly referring to software development. Last week I attended a webinar hosted by ITMPI and given by one of the employees at QSM. His talk was about the measurement of productivity in IT, specifically focused on how to account for variations in productivity when estimating. The talk was pretty good, but one of his early slides bothered me.

On that one slide he argued that software development wasn’t like manufacturing and therefore productivity couldn’t be measured like manufacturing does. Unfortunately, he offered no alternative during the talk. Instead he focused on how to measure unexplained variations in project outcomes and to aggregate this into some sort of vague productivity calculation. On the whole, useful for estimating if you just want to know the odds of a certain effort outcome, but not so useful if you want to learn about what factors impact productivity.

It’s true that software development doesn’t have a lot in common with manufacturing and the analogies drawn are often strained. That’s not so concerning to me, as the spirit of what management is often asking is right – what choices can I make to do this faster, better or cheaper. In that context, productivity isn’t just something you find out about after the fact, it’s something you want to understand.

With my own research, we’ve found measurable evidence that certain activities do make a difference in productivity. Colocation is worn about 5% better productivity. Committing resources to projects is worth about 0.4% for every 1% more committed on average your team is to a project. Which gets back to the question I posed in the title: is variability good?

In short, no. But the longer answer is, just like any process, you have to know what to control. With a highly thought intensive process, there are things you can and should seek to control to produce more predictable outcomes. It is true that software development is a more like the design of a product than the manufacture of one, but that doesn’t mean that anything goes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *